Motionless In White’s “Abigail” and Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible”.

“I say that God is dead!” Seems legit to say, if you’re a woman sentenced to death for witchcraft.. Or if you are a man who has lost his faith in mankind, and in the church he believed in. That’s one of the lines in Motionless In White‘s metalcore song Abigail. The supercool thing is that the whole storyline of the song perfectly corresponds to a metalcore account of Arthur Miller‘s play The Crucible. Indeed, the character John Proctor, at the end of the play says, “his mind wild, breathless”:

“I say–I say–God is dead!”

But, before going on following the track of desperation, I’ll give you a bit of background about the play. Well, it is a semi-fictional version of the Salem witch trials, occurred in Massachusetts in which “a group of young girls […] claimed to be possessed by the devil and accused several local women of witchcraft”. Miller’s real intent was to denounce the practice of McCarthism in the United States, using the events of the Salem trials as an allegory.

Motionless In White grasped the very dark essence of the play and the historical occurrence, and put it into music. They’re kinda the mastergoths of metalcore, all black everything. “Abigail”, which is the name of one of the characters in Miller’s play, is a single from MIW’s debut album Creatures, which is pretty cool considering that they let fans send them their ideas for lyrics and included them in the album, which is a great example of horror and gothic metalcore. The album is permeated with literary references, that is why I will definitely write a looong post about it. There are 12 tracks in the album, and each of them is devoted to a a “creature” or character belonging to the dark universe of gothic literature and contemporary film production.

There you go, enjoy the video of the song, remember to headbang!

Cheers, grim readers!

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